Welcome to Make It Our Business

News & Events

Anti-Workplace Violence book among the 49 books powerful women study in detail
New ILO Treaty to protect workers from violence and harassment
Canada: Summary Of Saskatchewan's New Domestic Violence Legislation
Deals on paid time off for domestic violence 'beginning of a wave': Expert
Mental Health Advocates Ask Why 70% Of Workplaces Don't Have This Crucial Safety Policy
New Study Shows High Cost of Domestic and Sexual Violence
How new domestic violence laws will change the workplace
Vodafone to introduce global policy to provide 10 days paid safe leave for staff suffering domestic abuse
HDGH launching new violence in the workplace awareness campaign
Canada - What’s new in employment law in 2019

Make it our Business: Addressing Domestic Violence in the Workplace 

Make It Our Business provides information and education to help employers and other workplace stakeholders to meet their obligations under the Ontario Occupational Health and Safety Act. According to the Act, employers must prevent and respond to domestic violence in the workplace. Read more...

Problems at home can come to work Brochure cover Recognize and respond to domestic violence in your workplace Brochure cover I need safety and support at work Brochure cover

PlainText Brochures:

  1. Problems at home can come to work
  2. Recognize and respond to domestic violence in your workplace
  3. I need safety and support at work

No front page content has been created yet.

MIOB Blog

Workplace Domestic Violence: Supporting Workers with Disabilities

mom with two sonsFor employers, the obligation to protect workers who may be experiencing domestic violence and who also have a disability requires sensitivity and training on multiple and unique barriers that increase vulnerability. Women with disabilities cross all demographics. Race, class and ethnicity are elements of a person’s identity that combine with disability to create additional social disadvantages. A racialized woman with a disability is likely to have experienced multiple forms of discrimination based on her race, gender and ability.